Biodiversity promotes ecosystem multitasking

Today, colleagues from around the globe and I published a paper in Nature Communications titled “Biodiversity enhances ecosystem multifunctionality across trophic levels and habitats.” The paper is an important step forward in connecting biological diversity — the variety of organisms living in an ecosystem — to the myriad processes operating in natural, functioning ecosystems. Its worth digging a bit into this analysis, and explaining a little bit about why its important.

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How much is enough? A new technique for quantifying precision of community surveys

Being an ecologist is all about the trade-off between effort, and time and money. Given infinite amounts of both, we would undoubtedly sample the heck out of nature. But it would be an exercise in diminishing returns: after a certain amount of sampling, we would fail to unturn any stone that has not already been unturned. Thus, ecology is a balancing act of effort: too little, and we have no real insight. Too much, and we’ve wasted a lot of time and money.

I’m always looking for ways to improve my balance, which is why I was interested to see a new paper in Ecology Letters called “Measures of precision for dissimilarity-based multivariate analysis of ecological communities” by Marti Anderson and Julia Santana-Garcon.

In a nutshell, the paper introduces a method for, “assessing sample-size adequacy in studies of ecological communities.” Put in a slightly different way, the authors have devised a technique for determining when additional sampling does not really improve one’s ability to describe whole communities — both the number of species, and their relative abundances. Perfect for evaluating when enough is enough, and adjusting the output of time and money!

In this post, I dig into this technique, show its applications using an example, and introduce a new R function to assess multivariate precision quickly and easily.

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